Home The Old Dutch Church and Burying Ground of Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., is one of the oldest churches in the country and the setting for much of Washington Irvings's &quot;Legend of Sleepy Hollow.&quot; http://www.odcfriends.org/index.php 2017-12-15T02:19:42Z Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management Old Dutch Fall 2013 2013-09-21T02:45:34Z 2013-09-21T02:45:34Z http://www.odcfriends.org/index.php/component/content/article/1-miscellaneous-content/82-old-dutch-fall-2013 Janie Couch couch.janie@gmail.com <p><img src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/ODCTitle.png" alt="ODCTitle" height="146" width="579" /><strong><span style="color: #993366;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <h1><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><span style="color: #003300;">The little church made world-famous by Washington Irving's "Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is closed during winter except for special events. The Reformed Church of the Tarrytowns will hold Good Friday services on the evening of April 18, 2014, and a Sunrise Service on Easter morning, April 20. Everyone is welcome. <br /></span></span></h1> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><span style="color: #003300;"><br /></span></span></p> <p><img src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/ODCTitle.png" alt="ODCTitle" height="146" width="579" /><strong><span style="color: #993366;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <h1><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><span style="color: #003300;">The little church made world-famous by Washington Irving's "Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is closed during winter except for special events. The Reformed Church of the Tarrytowns will hold Good Friday services on the evening of April 18, 2014, and a Sunrise Service on Easter morning, April 20. Everyone is welcome. <br /></span></span></h1> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><span style="color: #003300;"><br /></span></span></p> The Church That Inspired the Legend 2010-06-22T06:43:25Z 2010-06-22T06:43:25Z http://www.odcfriends.org/index.php/component/content/article/31-tour-the-church Janie Couch couch.janie@gmail.com <br /> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" alt="ODC-April_2-CF000213_4_5_6_7" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/ODC-April_2-CF000213_4_5_6_7.jpg" height="432" width="555" /></p> <p>The Old Dutch was old when the American Revolution began. Immortalized by Washington Irving in "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," Old Dutch is also associated with another Washington—General George Washington. He wrote in his diary that on July 2, 1781, he and his Continental Army rested at the church until dusk.</p> <h4>The Octagonal Pulpit</h4> <h4><img style="margin: 6px; float: right;" title="Pulpit with sounding board::Photo by J. Couch" class="jcetooltip" alt="pulpit4" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/pulpit4.jpg" height="303" width="209" /></h4> <p>In early church services, the domine, or pastor, climbed the steps to the octagonal pulpit and preached sermons in Dutch to farmers seated on backless oak benches. Meanwhile, the lord and lady of the manor sat oneither side of the pulpit on raised "thrones," probably cushioned chairs with silk canopies.</p> <p>The pulpit with sounding board is an exact replica of the original. The sounding board was useful in the days before sound systems for reflecting the pastor's words down to the congregation.</p> <h4>The Communion Table</h4> <p>Catherine, the second wife of Frederick Philipse, willed the 17th-century black oak communion table with ebony inlay to the church. Beneath it, in a crypt under the floorboards, Frederick, Catherine and some 14 family members are buried.</p> <p><img class="jcetooltip" title="Oak communion table with ebony inlay::Photo by J. Couch" style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/communion_table1.jpg" alt="communion_table1" height="327" width="488" /></p> <br /> <h4></h4> <h4><img title="Noack tracker organ, installedl in 1998::Photo by J. Couch" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: right;" alt="organ2" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/organ2.jpg" height="309" width="230" /></h4> <h4>Noack Tracker Organ</h4> <p>The pipe organ is modern; the wood case is in the style of a 17th-century Dutch church organ. Master organ builder Fritz Noack installed a tracker organ in the case in 1998. And if you're wondering about the funny-looking sled in the gallery, it's actually a coffin carrier. Coffins were eased on the carrier through a window.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <h4><img title="1685 Bell::Photo by L. Anderson" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Misc_-_Church_Bell_-_ODC_Gravestones-119" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Misc_-_Church_Bell_-_ODC_Gravestones-119.jpg" height="336" width="264" />Original 1685 Bell</h4> <p>The congregation hired its first pastor, or dominie, in 1697. Guiliam Bertholf came from New Jersey several times a year to administer the sacraments (in his absence, the Voorleser, or public reader, led services). The church's two-foot-thick fieldstone walls and Dutch Frisian-design roof were a welcome sight after his long trip. Arriving, he'd first glimpse the belfry. It's sturdy bell—the same one you see today—is richlydecorated with gargoyles, birds and other creatures. Inscribed on it is 1685 and a Latin Bible verse: "If God be for us, who can be against us?"</p> <p> </p> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4>The Copper Weathervane</h4> <p><img title="Weathervane with Philipse trademark::Photo by L. Anderson" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Misc_-_VF_Pennant_-_ODC_Gravestones-103_001" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Misc_-_VF_Pennant_-_ODC_Gravestones-103_001.jpg" height="247" width="154" /></p> <p>Next he might spot the copper weathervane bearing the Philipse's brand mark, an "F" for Flypse, the Dutch spelling.</p> <p>The dominie would enter the church through a door on the south side. In 1837 the door was moved to the west side after the Albany Post Road was rerouted. Yellow bricks from Holland below a window mark the door's original location. In the same year, the original windows—small rectangles with sills seven feet up the walls—were replaced with arched windows.</p> <br /> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" alt="ODC-April_2-CF000213_4_5_6_7" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/ODC-April_2-CF000213_4_5_6_7.jpg" height="432" width="555" /></p> <p>The Old Dutch was old when the American Revolution began. Immortalized by Washington Irving in "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," Old Dutch is also associated with another Washington—General George Washington. He wrote in his diary that on July 2, 1781, he and his Continental Army rested at the church until dusk.</p> <h4>The Octagonal Pulpit</h4> <h4><img style="margin: 6px; float: right;" title="Pulpit with sounding board::Photo by J. Couch" class="jcetooltip" alt="pulpit4" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/pulpit4.jpg" height="303" width="209" /></h4> <p>In early church services, the domine, or pastor, climbed the steps to the octagonal pulpit and preached sermons in Dutch to farmers seated on backless oak benches. Meanwhile, the lord and lady of the manor sat oneither side of the pulpit on raised "thrones," probably cushioned chairs with silk canopies.</p> <p>The pulpit with sounding board is an exact replica of the original. The sounding board was useful in the days before sound systems for reflecting the pastor's words down to the congregation.</p> <h4>The Communion Table</h4> <p>Catherine, the second wife of Frederick Philipse, willed the 17th-century black oak communion table with ebony inlay to the church. Beneath it, in a crypt under the floorboards, Frederick, Catherine and some 14 family members are buried.</p> <p><img class="jcetooltip" title="Oak communion table with ebony inlay::Photo by J. Couch" style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/communion_table1.jpg" alt="communion_table1" height="327" width="488" /></p> <br /> <h4></h4> <h4><img title="Noack tracker organ, installedl in 1998::Photo by J. Couch" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: right;" alt="organ2" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/organ2.jpg" height="309" width="230" /></h4> <h4>Noack Tracker Organ</h4> <p>The pipe organ is modern; the wood case is in the style of a 17th-century Dutch church organ. Master organ builder Fritz Noack installed a tracker organ in the case in 1998. And if you're wondering about the funny-looking sled in the gallery, it's actually a coffin carrier. Coffins were eased on the carrier through a window.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <h4><img title="1685 Bell::Photo by L. Anderson" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Misc_-_Church_Bell_-_ODC_Gravestones-119" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Misc_-_Church_Bell_-_ODC_Gravestones-119.jpg" height="336" width="264" />Original 1685 Bell</h4> <p>The congregation hired its first pastor, or dominie, in 1697. Guiliam Bertholf came from New Jersey several times a year to administer the sacraments (in his absence, the Voorleser, or public reader, led services). The church's two-foot-thick fieldstone walls and Dutch Frisian-design roof were a welcome sight after his long trip. Arriving, he'd first glimpse the belfry. It's sturdy bell—the same one you see today—is richlydecorated with gargoyles, birds and other creatures. Inscribed on it is 1685 and a Latin Bible verse: "If God be for us, who can be against us?"</p> <p> </p> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4></h4> <h4>The Copper Weathervane</h4> <p><img title="Weathervane with Philipse trademark::Photo by L. Anderson" class="jcetooltip" style="margin: 6px; float: left;" alt="Misc_-_VF_Pennant_-_ODC_Gravestones-103_001" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Misc_-_VF_Pennant_-_ODC_Gravestones-103_001.jpg" height="247" width="154" /></p> <p>Next he might spot the copper weathervane bearing the Philipse's brand mark, an "F" for Flypse, the Dutch spelling.</p> <p>The dominie would enter the church through a door on the south side. In 1837 the door was moved to the west side after the Albany Post Road was rerouted. Yellow bricks from Holland below a window mark the door's original location. In the same year, the original windows—small rectangles with sills seven feet up the walls—were replaced with arched windows.</p> Early American Gravestone Art 2010-06-22T13:36:51Z 2010-06-22T13:36:51Z http://www.odcfriends.org/index.php/component/content/article/16-unfiled-articles/33-tour-the-burying-ground Janie Couch couch.janie@gmail.com <img title="Zuricher engraving::" class="jcetooltip" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Sould_Effigy.png" alt="Sould_Effigy" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" height="284" width="632" /> <p> </p> <p>It is believed there was a burying ground here at the Old Dutch Church even before the church was built in 1685. The oldest grave that can be identified today is dated 1755.</p> <p>Among the headstones are some of the earliest and most enduring examples of American folk art. One of the most respected carvers of headstones in the burying ground was Solomon Brewer. He lived in Greenburgh, New York, and was also a stonemason, schoolteacher, auctioneer and census taker. He decorated headstones with soul effigies, an 18th-century symbol of the soul’s flight to heaven. Round faces with downturned eyes at the outer corners distinguish his soul effigies. <br /><br />Master carver John Zuricher of New York City also deserves mention. His soul effigies—sometimes square, oval or pear-shaped—bear distinctive puffy cheeks (see the photo above). <br /><br />The choice of stone is an indication of the age of the grave. Red sandstone used throughout the 1700s gave way to white marble in the 1800s, and marble to durable granite in the 1900s.</p> <p>Visitors interested in locating graves of their ancestors buried at Old Dutch may want to click on the "Searching for Ancestors?" link in the left panel. <br /><br /><br /></p> <img title="Zuricher engraving::" class="jcetooltip" src="http://www.odcfriends.org/images/stories/Sould_Effigy.png" alt="Sould_Effigy" style="margin: 5px; float: left;" height="284" width="632" /> <p> </p> <p>It is believed there was a burying ground here at the Old Dutch Church even before the church was built in 1685. The oldest grave that can be identified today is dated 1755.</p> <p>Among the headstones are some of the earliest and most enduring examples of American folk art. One of the most respected carvers of headstones in the burying ground was Solomon Brewer. He lived in Greenburgh, New York, and was also a stonemason, schoolteacher, auctioneer and census taker. He decorated headstones with soul effigies, an 18th-century symbol of the soul’s flight to heaven. Round faces with downturned eyes at the outer corners distinguish his soul effigies. <br /><br />Master carver John Zuricher of New York City also deserves mention. His soul effigies—sometimes square, oval or pear-shaped—bear distinctive puffy cheeks (see the photo above). <br /><br />The choice of stone is an indication of the age of the grave. Red sandstone used throughout the 1700s gave way to white marble in the 1800s, and marble to durable granite in the 1900s.</p> <p>Visitors interested in locating graves of their ancestors buried at Old Dutch may want to click on the "Searching for Ancestors?" link in the left panel. <br /><br /><br /></p>